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Vital Signs:  News from the UW-Madison Department of Medicine Thursday, October 19, 2017 Changes in gut bacteria could be linked to Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new study from the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health. The study, “Gut microbiome alterations in Alzheimer’s disease,” was...

Guest:  Jane Mahoney, MD, Professor, UW Division of Geriatrics;  Director, Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Institute The Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Institute was founded in 1998 and is within the UW-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health.  It is separate from the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center which was established in...

Conversational cues may arise sooner than other signs of mental decline. By Lisa Esposito, Staff Writer | Aug. 11, 2017, at 10:04 a.m. If your memory seems OK but your speech is slipping – you can find the car keys but not always your words – should you be concerned?...

Talk to someone at the University of Wisconsin-Madison who is working in Alzheimer’s disease research, clinical care, or outreach, and you’ll quickly notice that fighting the condition is a team effort with as much grit and dedication as any Badgers football season. Through a network...

People who experience hearing loss could be at greater risk of memory and thinking problems later in life than those without auditory issues, research suggests. The study focused on people who were at risk of Alzheimer’s disease, revealing that those who were diagnosed with hearing...

Harsh life experiences appear to leave African-Americans vulnerable to Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia, researchers reported Sunday at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference in London. Several teams presented evidence that poverty, disadvantage and stressful life events are strongly associated with cognitive problems in middle age and...

By Sandee LaMotte, CNN One in three Americans doesn't get enough sleep, and 45% of the world's population doesn't, either. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention calls that a "public health problem," because disrupted sleep is associated with a higher risk of conditions including diabetes,...

TIME Health -- Regular exercise may offer some protection against Alzheimer's disease, even for people who are genetically at risk, according to recent research. In the study, published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, people who did more moderate-intensity physical activity were more likely to have healthy...